Mendocino

A Performance Tool for the Expert User



It is recommended you have this app when the computer starts. Don't start the app hidden though (leave the checkbox unchecked in System Preferences->Users and Groups->Login Items

Features:
1. Mendocino is an interactive desktop background. It makes your desktop a shortcut organizer.
2. Holding down control+shift and pressing any key will send an event to Mendocino
2. While holding control+shift, press any key to go to that room. For example, you press the 'cntrl+shift+d' key to go to the 'd' room. You press 'cntrl+shift+m' key to go to the 'm' room.
3. In that room there are 4 walls. Initially all the walls are blank. On each wall you can put a shortcut to a webpage, folder, app or document. To do that, press 'cntrl+shift+`' (right below escape... same key as ~) to tear Mendocino off the background. Then you can interact with each wall by pasting a webpage into the text box or dragging an icon there. When you are done, press 'cntrl+shift+`' to put Mendocino back to the desktop background.
4. Then use the arrow keys to follow the shortcut. For example, if you put www.apple.com on the left wall, you would press cntrl+shift+the left arrow key to get to www.apple.com. If the webpage is not open, it will open it. If it is already open, it will bring it to the front.
5. Open multiple items by pressing multiple arrow keys one after the other.
6. Press cntrl+shift+esc to hide Mendocino and to bring it out of being hidden. Mendocino still responds to key events even while hidden. 7. Press cntrl+shift+] or cntrl+shift+[ to change the current picture of the current wall.
At first glance, this app might just look like a bunch of organized shortcuts. And you'd be right. But let me explain the beauty of the app.

First, if users use this app, what will they be using less of? Turns out, users will use the dock less and cmd+tab less. Therefore, let's compare this app to those.

First, the dock. Let's say you want to go to Final Cut. You bring your mouse to the dock and click on Final Cut. It either opens Final Cut, or if it is already open, brings you to the already open Final Cut. In Mendocino, you launch the app with a keystroke, keystroke to the appropriate room, and keystroke an arrow key to open Final cut. Why is that better?

The Dock is a Short Pictural Semi-Ordered Unchanging list. Searching for an item in a list is something people do on computers all day long. Some lists are more taxing to look through than others. Here are some factors that affect how easy a list is to look through

Unordered lists are harder to look through than ordered lists
Long lists are harder to look through than short lists
Text lists are harder to look through than picture lists
Lists where the items in the list change positions are harder to look through than lists where the items stay in the same position.

Based on these criteria, the Dock is a pretty nice and easy list to look through. Small cost. It does take screen real estate, but you can auto show and hide it so that cost can go away will a simple preference change. Let's say you really value screen real estate so you auto show and hide the Dock. Having done that, which of the two methods will get you to Final Cut faster, the Dock or through Mendocino? That depends on if you are an expert user. A novice user won't remember where they placed the shortcuts and needs the user friendly atmosphere of the Dock to help them be productive. Mendocino requires the user to remember more than the Dock does. But expert users have lots of memory, and expert users can get to where they want to go faster with the keystrokes than with bringing the mouse to the dock, waiting the split second for the list to appear, locating the item in the list and clicking.

Let's take it one step further. Let's say you have Safari open with 5 tabs open and the current tab shows www.apple.com. You go over to Final Cut and do some editing and now you want to get to www.gmail.com which is one of your open tabs. With the Dock, you would go to the dock, find Safari, and click on it. Then Safari would show up, www.apple.com would be the open tab, and the other tabs display in a Short Textural Unordered Changing list. That list is not so enjoyable to look through. In Mendocino, "www.gmail.com" is a direct link within Safari to the tab you want to get to.

Still need more use? Let's say you want to open three different things - perhaps three things that you always open on startup. You want to open apple's mail app, but also gmail because some of your mail is there, and Stickies. With the Dock, you would locate Mail, click on it, locate Safari, click on it, locate Stickies, click on it, go back to Safari, chances are, click your shortcut to gmail or perhaps it is your homepage. In Mendocino? You could create a room for startup apps, maybe put it in room 's', and put Mail on the left wall, gmail on the center wall, and Stickies on the right wall. Then you would execute three keystrokes - cmd+3 to launch Mendocino, 's' to get to your room, and hit all three arrow keys quicklies at once, launching all three apps (cntrl a,s,d,f are the quicklies for the arrow keys). Again, this will only be faster for the expert user.

What about cmd+tab? Cmd+tab is a short (usually), Pictural Unordered Changing list. You strike the Cmd+Tab key to bring it up. Then you have to look through it to get to find the app you want to switch to. It's best use case is to switch to the app you were just previously on. The Mendocino does not include an optimization to switch to the app you were previously on because the current cmd+tab is doing that just fine. The Mendocino is designed to let you switch to an app, document or webpage quickly by keying its shortcut.

What are the weak points of the app? People forget where they put their shortcuts.
What are you doing to mitigate that? Nothing in this version of the app. In future versions you will be able to build a house and actually walk from room to room. With that, because people have excellent memory of where things are in 3D space (unless they have recently moved them - the "Where did I just put my keys? They are not in their normal spot!" scenario) if people forget the shortcut, they will be able to walk to the room in order to remember.

What other things are coming in future versions of the app? I want the app to be able to tell what the open window was right before it pops up and bring to immediately to that room. That way, if you remember that in 3D space, gmail is to the left of apple in the 'e' room, and you are on gmail, you can strike cmd+3 then left rather than cmd+3 then 'e' then left.

This app is just the beginning of tools for the expert user. It is not intended to replace any of the functionality of MacOS but simply give the expert user the ability to perform faster.



I made this app free because I am hoping someone out there knows an eager investor who would say - "Gee, this guy made a great app. I wonder what else he can make?" My insurance company is wonderful to work for, but I have passion beyond insurance.

Mendocino

A Performance Tool for the Expert User

Free Download

It is recommended you have this app when the computer starts. Don't start the app hidden though (leave the checkbox unchecked in System Preferences->Users and Groups->Login Items

Features:
1. Mendocino is an interactive desktop background. It makes your desktop a shortcut organizer.
2. Holding down control+shift and pressing any key will send an event to Mendocino
2. While holding control+shift, press any key to go to that room. For example, you press the 'cntrl+shift+d' key to go to the 'd' room. You press 'cntrl+shift+m' key to go to the 'm' room.
3. In that room there are 4 walls. Initially all the walls are blank. On each wall you can put a shortcut to a webpage, folder, app or document. To do that, press 'cntrl+shift+`' (right below escape... same key as ~) to tear Mendocino off the background. Then you can interact with each wall by pasting a webpage into the text box or dragging an icon there. When you are done, press 'cntrl+shift+`' to put Mendocino back to the desktop background.
4. Then use the arrow keys to follow the shortcut. For example, if you put www.apple.com on the left wall, you would press cntrl+shift+the left arrow key to get to www.apple.com. If the webpage is not open, it will open it. If it is already open, it will bring it to the front.
5. Open multiple items by pressing multiple arrow keys one after the other.
6. Press cntrl+shift+esc to hide Mendocino and to bring it out of being hidden. Mendocino still responds to key events even while hidden. 7. Press cntrl+shift+] or cntrl+shift+[ to change the current picture of the current wall.
At first glance, this app might just look like a bunch of organized shortcuts. And you'd be right. But let me explain the beauty of the app.

First, if users use this app, what will they be using less of? Turns out, users will use the dock less and cmd+tab less. Therefore, let's compare this app to those.

First, the dock. Let's say you want to go to Final Cut. You bring your mouse to the dock and click on Final Cut. It either opens Final Cut, or if it is already open, brings you to the already open Final Cut. In Mendocino, you launch the app with a keystroke, keystroke to the appropriate room, and keystroke an arrow key to open Final cut. Why is that better?

The Dock is a Short Pictural Semi-Ordered Unchanging list. Searching for an item in a list is something people do on computers all day long. Some lists are more taxing to look through than others. Here are some factors that affect how easy a list is to look through

Unordered lists are harder to look through than ordered lists
Long lists are harder to look through than short lists
Text lists are harder to look through than picture lists
Lists where the items in the list change positions are harder to look through than lists where the items stay in the same position.

Based on these criteria, the Dock is a pretty nice and easy list to look through. Small cost. It does take screen real estate, but you can auto show and hide it so that cost can go away will a simple preference change. Let's say you really value screen real estate so you auto show and hide the Dock. Having done that, which of the two methods will get you to Final Cut faster, the Dock or through Mendocino? That depends on if you are an expert user. A novice user won't remember where they placed the shortcuts and needs the user friendly atmosphere of the Dock to help them be productive. Mendocino requires the user to remember more than the Dock does. But expert users have lots of memory, and expert users can get to where they want to go faster with the keystrokes than with bringing the mouse to the dock, waiting the split second for the list to appear, locating the item in the list and clicking.

Let's take it one step further. Let's say you have Safari open with 5 tabs open and the current tab shows www.apple.com. You go over to Final Cut and do some editing and now you want to get to www.gmail.com which is one of your open tabs. With the Dock, you would go to the dock, find Safari, and click on it. Then Safari would show up, www.apple.com would be the open tab, and the other tabs display in a Short Textural Unordered Changing list. That list is not so enjoyable to look through. In Mendocino, "www.gmail.com" is a direct link within Safari to the tab you want to get to.

Still need more use? Let's say you want to open three different things - perhaps three things that you always open on startup. You want to open apple's mail app, but also gmail because some of your mail is there, and Stickies. With the Dock, you would locate Mail, click on it, locate Safari, click on it, locate Stickies, click on it, go back to Safari, chances are, click your shortcut to gmail or perhaps it is your homepage. In Mendocino? You could create a room for startup apps, maybe put it in room 's', and put Mail on the left wall, gmail on the center wall, and Stickies on the right wall. Then you would execute three keystrokes - cmd+3 to launch Mendocino, 's' to get to your room, and hit all three arrow keys quicklies at once, launching all three apps (cntrl a,s,d,f are the quicklies for the arrow keys). Again, this will only be faster for the expert user.

What about cmd+tab? Cmd+tab is a short (usually), Pictural Unordered Changing list. You strike the Cmd+Tab key to bring it up. Then you have to look through it to get to find the app you want to switch to. It's best use case is to switch to the app you were just previously on. The Mendocino does not include an optimization to switch to the app you were previously on because the current cmd+tab is doing that just fine. The Mendocino is designed to let you switch to an app, document or webpage quickly by keying its shortcut.

What are the weak points of the app? People forget where they put their shortcuts.
What are you doing to mitigate that? Nothing in this version of the app. In future versions you will be able to build a house and actually walk from room to room. With that, because people have excellent memory of where things are in 3D space (unless they have recently moved them - the "Where did I just put my keys? They are not in their normal spot!" scenario) if people forget the shortcut, they will be able to walk to the room in order to remember.

What other things are coming in future versions of the app? I want the app to be able to tell what the open window was right before it pops up and bring to immediately to that room. That way, if you remember that in 3D space, gmail is to the left of apple in the 'e' room, and you are on gmail, you can strike cmd+3 then left rather than cmd+3 then 'e' then left.

This app is just the beginning of tools for the expert user. It is not intended to replace any of the functionality of MacOS but simply give the expert user the ability to perform faster.



I made this app free because I am hoping someone out there knows an eager investor who would say - "Gee, this guy made a great app. I wonder what else he can make?" My insurance company is wonderful to work for, but I have passion beyond insurance.

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